End exhibition

    


Bristol show

    


Letterpress

    


statement

First draft statement for the final exhibition

My work explores abstractions role in illustration, showing how it can shift from existing next to a philosophical text into an illustration of poetry. The relationship between the first 3 books and the 4th book is through a verse of poetry. The first three lines can be found on the back page of books one, two, and three. Whilst three fourth line is on the front cover of the fourth book. The books also explore the emotional swing in these two topics, from contemplation to memory, and how these themes can both produce similar visual outcomes. The painting is an addition to the set and comes in as a fifth item, creating a linked space through recurring compositions found abstractly in the first 3 books, and representationally (as the horizon) in the fourth.


Book sleeve experiment 

 Here is a look at sme of the experiments I have done to decide on book sleeve (for the first 3 books) ideas. I know I want it to be white and blind embossed with the chapter title on the front and the book title on the spine. What was difficult with the sleeve was getting the right paper. I tried 4 or five different papers before choosing Fabriano as the best. I chose Fabriano as it is strong, yet soft enough to get a good emboss with the letterpress. 


Woodblock emboss front cover experiment

Here are a few images of an experiment that didn’t work out to well. The plan was to emboss the graph by using a woodblock technique. It didn’t turn out too well however I’m glad I tried the technique. I later experimented with using a bonefold and pressing the image into the paper. This worked really well and gave the clean crisp image I’m looking for.


Bristol Exhibition

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Here are a few pictures i took after setting up our group exhibition. Im really happy with the outcome, the space looks really clean and professional. I used bulldog clips to hang my work because it is simple, doesn’t ruin the work, and doesn’t distract the audience.